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Scintillation Detectors

Scintillation Detectors

We have been supplying radiation detectors to the UK nuclear industry since 1975

Cerium Bromide Detectors

Cerium Bromide Detectors

Introducing the novel scintillation detector - Cerium Bromide a superb alternative to Lanthanum Halide Detectors

Bespoke Scintillation Detectors

Bespoke Scintillation Detectors

We can build the detector to answer your exact requirements, contact us for further information

Detector Electronics

Detector Electronics

Plug on bases & signal processing solutions

We Supply Scintillation Detectors

Our comprehensive range of scintillation detectors covers applications ranging from industrial & medical to homeland security & research.

Examples of how our detectors are currently being used:

  • Thickness Gauging
  • Plutonium Assay
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • Anti-Neutrio detection
  • Portal Monitors
  • Oil Exploration

The format of scintillation detectors we sell:

  • Liquid Scintillators
  • Plastic Organic Detectors
  • Novel Detector Materials
  • Standard Scintillation Crystals
  • Integrated or demountable electronics
  • Various Window Options
  • Analytical Electronics & Software

Please contact us to discuss your requirements & explore options.

Detector-slice

Which Scintillator For Your Application?

The table below presents an overview of the most commonly used scintillation materials with some of their specific applications.

The choice of the best scintillation crystal to use in your radiation detector depends strongly on the application. Important questions to ask to determine the optimum choice are:

  • What is the energy of the radiation to measure?
  • What is the expected count rate?
  • What are the experimental conditions (temperature, shock)?
Materials Important Properties Major Applications
Nal(TI) Very high light output, good energy resolution General scintillation counting, Health Physics, environmental monitoring, high temperature use
Csl(TI) Non-hygroscopic, rugged Particle and high energy physics, general radiation detection, photo diode readout, phoswiches
Csl(Na) High light output, rugged Geophysical, general radiation detection
Csl(undoped) Fast, non-hygroscopic Physics (calorimetry)
CaF2(Eu) LowZ, high light output p detectors, a/p phoswiches
LaCI3:Ce(0.9) Very high light output, very good energy resolution High resolution scintillation spectroscopy, Health Physics environmental monitoring
CeBr3 Very high light output, very good energy resolution, low background High resolution spectroscopy, low background applications
6Lil(Eu) High neutron cross-section, high light output Thermal neutron detection and spectroscopy
6Li-glass High neutron cross section, non-hygroscopic Thermal neutral detection
BaF2 Ultra-fast sub-ns UV emission Positron life time studies, physics research, fast timing
YAP(Ce) High light output, low Z, fast MHz-X-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron physics
LYSO High density and Z, fast Physics research, PET, High Energy Physics
BGO High density and Z Particle physics, geophysical research PET, anti-Compton spectrometers.
CdW04 Very high density, low afterglow Slow decay times DC measurement of X-rays (high intensity), readout with photodiodes, Computerized Tomography (CT)
PbW04 Fast, high density, low afterglow Physics research (calorimetry)
Plastics Fast, low density and Z high light output General counting, particle and neutron detection.

Choosing a detector

The table above presents an overview of the most commonly used scintillation materials with some of their specific applications.

When we observe the “Scintillator Properties” table carefully, it is clear that none of presently known scintillation crystals possesses all the ideal characteristics such as high density, fast decay etc. The choice of a certain scintillation crystal in a radiation detector depends strongly on the application. Important questions to ask to determine the optimum choice are:

  • What is the energy of the radiation to measure?
  • What is the expected count rate?
  • What are the experimental conditions (temperature, shock)?

Scintillator Reference Material: